Reviews

About Age Of Consent

“Leimbach’s scenes are convincing, whether they portray harrowing abuse or subtle moments of healing.”—Publishers Weekly

“Leimbach is known for tackling tough subjects in an unflinching manner, and this novel is no exception.”—Booklist, STARRED review

“…offers a horribly believable depiction of a child ensnared by a predator. In giving a voice to Bobbie’s mother as well as Bobbie, she foregoes the urge to simply blame a woman who failed to protect her daughter….Devastatingly powerful.”—Kirkus

 

About The Man From Saigon

“Leimbach’s mastery of place, of the scents, sounds, terrors, and sorrows of that time reminded me as perhaps only a great novel can that we are never done with a war even when it is long over, and that only wars and love endure.” —Dr. Abraham Verghese, author of Cutting for Stone

“Vivid and powerful” —Publisher’s Weekly (starred)

“Fast-paced, vividly descriptive. . . . Leimbach’s emphasis on a female reporter in a war that was so often covered by men is refreshing.” —The New York Times Book Review

Writers are always told in writing classes to write about what you know. What Leimbach knows and writes about superbly is the human heart, its relationship with others, and its conflicts with duty, fear, and ambition… You won’t want to put it down for anything except reluctant pauses for necessities. —Karl Marlantes, author of the international bestselling book, Matterhorn

 

 

About The Man From Saigon

“Leimbach’s mastery of place, of the scents, sounds, terrors, and sorrows of that time reminded me as perhaps only a great novel can that we are never done with a war even when it is long over, and that only wars and love endure.” —Dr. Abraham Verghese, author of Cutting for Stone

“Vivid and powerful” —Publisher’s Weekly (starred)

“Fast-paced, vividly descriptive. . . . Leimbach’s emphasis on a female reporter in a war that was so often covered by men is refreshing.” —The New York Times Book Review

Writers are always told in writing classes to write about what you know. What Leimbach knows and writes about superbly is the human heart, its relationship with others, and its conflicts with duty, fear, and ambition… You won’t want to put it down for anything except reluctant pauses for necessities. —Karl Marlantes, author of the international bestselling book, Matterhorn